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US added 58 MW of biomass capacity in September

Data released by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission shows the U.S. added 238 MW of biomass

capacity during the first three quarters of 2017, up from 57 MW during the same period of 2016.
 
The FERC released the September edition of its Energy Infrastructure Update in early November, indicating

the U.S. added one biomass unit with 58 MW of capacity in September. During the first three quarters of the year,

the report shows the U.S. added 24 biomass units with a combined capacity of 238 MW. During the same nine-month

period of last year, the U.S. added 27 biomass units with a combined capacity of 57 MW.
 
The report shows the U.S. added a total of 518 electrical generating units during the first nine months of the year,

with a combined capacity of 19,664 MW. In addition to the biomass units, this includes 73 natural gas units with a

combined capacity of 10,980 MW; one nuclear unit with 102 MW of capacity; eight oil units with a combined 36 MW

of capacity, nine hydro units with a combined 211 MW of capacity; 49 wind units with a combined 4,737 MW of

capacity; one geothermal steam unit with 18 MW of capacity; 333 solar units with a combined 3,121 MW of capacity;

one waste heat unit with 220 MW of capacity; and 19 units classified as “other” with a combined capacity of 1 MW.

During the same period of last year, the U.S. added 478 units with a combined 14,839 MW of capacity.
 
In its report, the FERC highlights Albany Green Energy LLC’s 58 MW Proctor & Gamble biomass project in

Dougherty County, Georgia, which was brought online in September. Power produced at the facility is sold to

Georgia Power Co. under a long-term contract.
 
As of the end of September, the U.S. had 16.76 GW of installed biomass capacity, accounting for approximately

1.41 percent of total U.S. capacity. Overall, the U.S. has 1,197.28 GW of capacity in place.


                                                                                                                                                                                      Source:Biomass Magazine